Inland Empire books

After a comment from reader Bob Terry about Z for Zanja, in which he referenced the tome “Windows in an Old Adobe,” I heard from another Bob, reader Bob House. He writes:

“Mention of ‘Windows in an Old Adobe’ got me to revisit the Inland Empire section of my bookshelf to find ‘A World of Its Own’ by Matt Garcia, ‘Claremont: A Pictorial History’ by Judy Wright, ‘Mexican Serenade’ by Pauline Deuel (about the Padua Hills Theater and Players), ‘Pomona Queen’ by Kem Nunn and ‘Sleeping Giant: An Illustrated History of Southern California’s Inland Empire’ by Rob Wagner (and published by the Daily Bulletin).

“I’d really like to hear what other books about or set in the Inland Empire you and other readers may have or know about.”

There are a fair number of city histories, Bob, although to be candid, most leave an awful lot to be desired in the readability department. We can only hope my colleague Joe Blackstock writes a history someday; as his Daily Bulletin columns prove, he not only knows his history, he knows how to research and he can write, too. Most of our history writers, bless ‘em, can do only one or two out of the three.

That said, a few of the books on my shelves: Charles Phoenix’s “Cruising the Pomona Valley”; Don Clucas’ “Light Over the Mountain,” about Cucamonga, and “Upland, a Century of Community”; Ruth Austen’s “Ontario” and William King’s “Pomona,” two coffee table books; Gloria Ricci Lothrop’s “Pomona, a Centennial History”; and another Bulletin-published book, “Witness to a Century,” by Blackstock and Wagner.

Anyone want to add to the list?

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  • John Clifford

    And there is, of course, our newest history (more of a photo history), Images of America: Early Pomona by Mickey Gallivan and the Historical Society of America. It’s one of those brown paperbacks that Arcadia Press has done on almost every city.

    [Forgot about those. The Inland Valley isn't well represented in that series but Pomona, Montclair and Norco, and maybe Fontana, all have books. -- DA]

  • http://www.myspace.com/the_ron Ronald Scott

    Sleeping Giant: An Illustrated History of the Inland Empire is an awesome book. Have you read that one?

    [Haven't, but I do own a copy. We had a blogging glitch today with the software and a comment that came in and was posted vanished. The writer, whose name I've forgotten, recommended the anthology Inlandia, a book of stories, poems and essays about the Inland Empire. -- DA]

  • Gino L. Filippi

    Sleeping Giant by Rob Wagner is very well done. The chapter of our valley’s grape and wine history is the most complete recall of viticulture history to date. Rob, Rene’ Biane and I worked together. Hope you enjoy! GF

    [Nice hearing from you, GF. -- DA]

  • Matt

    There is a great book at the Upland Library about the history of the local citrus industry. It’s very interesting. I was watching a recent “Antiques Roadshow” that featured some citrus labels, several from our local area.

  • Bob House

    Thanks to you, David, and to the forgotten reader for the tip on “Inlandia.” I found a cheap copy on the Internet and, although it’s a little more San Berdoo/Riverside-focused than I would like, it’s a great book for an IE geek.

    [The SB-Riverside slant is the reason I've only dipped into it, although I do hope to get to it one day. -- DA]

  • Don Clucas

    Hi David,

    I’m not actually a blogger, but I happened to catch your blog of July 28th of last year. It’s a little disheartening to see my name and two of my books listed after the following comment:

    “There are a fair number of city histories, Bob, although to be candid, most leave an awful lot to be desired in the readability department. We can only hope my colleague Joe Blackstock writes a history someday; as his Daily Bulletin columns prove, he not only knows his history, he knows how to research and he can write, too. Most of our history writers, bless ‘em, can do only one or two out of the three.”

    [You know I love ya, Don. -- DA]