Ducks re-sign Maroon, Crunch’s second-leading scorer.

When the Ducks obtained Patrick Maroon from the Philadelphia Flyers last November, general manager Bob Murray called it a “second chance” for a player who was abruptly dismissed from the Flyers’ American Hockey League affiliate a month earlier.

Maroon took advantage of that chance and was rewarded with a one-year contract that pays $550,000 in the NHL and $60,000 in the AHL.

The 23-year-old winger had 21 goals and 48 points — both second on the Crunch — in 57 games last season after joining Syracuse from the Adirondack Phantoms. The Ducks originally acquired Maroon and David Laliberte from the Flyers for Danny Syvret and Rob Bordson.

A sixth-round draft pick by the Flyers in 2007, the 6-foot-4, 225-pound winger has spent all four of his professional seasons in the AHL.

Ellis likely to start; New third line?; Black Aces up.

Dan Ellis was the first of the three Ducks goalies to leave the ice at the morning skate. That’s usually a good sign that he will be the starter, as if the writing weren’t on the wall already.

At his post-skate presser, Randy Carlyle at once declined to name his starter and explained why he doesn’t: “I’m sure that Barry Trotz and his staff have dissected what all three of our goalies have done. They probably had to do more work because we know who’s going to play for Nashville.”

Meanwhile, the forward lines stayed the same:

Ryan-Getzlaf-Perry
Blake-Koivu-Selanne
Beleskey-Bonino-McMillan
Winchester-Marchant-Parros
Ruutu-Chipchura-Sexton

Brandon McMillan is definitely skating at right wing. I think I might have mistakenly penciled him down on the left side earlier, maybe because that’s the only position other than center he’s played in his first NHL season. Switching a productive two-way center to the right side in favor of another rookie (Bonino) who hasn’t scored a point in the NHL all season is a bit unexpected, assuming Beleskey, Bonino and McMillan are in the lineup tonight against Nashville.

Carlyle, of course, had his reasons.
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