UCLA flood spreads to Pauley Pavilion, football locker room

photo (4)-L

Less than two years after its $136 million remodel, Pauley Pavilion was flooded Tuesday.

The photo above, taken by the Daily News’ Gene Blevins, shows some of the damage done by a broken water main near Sunset Blvd. According to the LADWP, a total of eight to 10 million gallons of water poured out of the 30-inch pipe. It still isn’t clear how much repairs will cost, but due to a break in the pipe — originally built in 1921 — the water on the floor of the court was reportedly eight inches deep.

The Bruins start their basketball season on Nov. 14 against Montana State.

“At this hour, we are still gathering information and, to the extent possible, assessing the damage to our athletic facilities affected by the water main break,” athletic director Dan Guerrero said in a statement. “Regarding specific inquiries and concerns about Pauley Pavilion, most people are aware by now that the floor and locker rooms sustained significant flooding. The water will be removed from the floor tonight. We will then reassess the situation tomorrow morning and be able to provide additional information at the appropriate time.”

In a statement, UCLA chancellor Gene Block listed the other affected locations as: parking lots 4 and 7, Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center, the J.D. Morgan Center, the Acosta Center and John Wooden Center, the intramural field, and Bruin Plaza.

Water also covered most of the track at Drake Stadium, and reached UCLA’s locker room. Spaulding Field did not appear to sustain damage.

UCLA is releasing regular updates here.

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

UCLA basketball announces 2014-15 season schedule

UCLA starts its 2014-15 basketball season on Nov. 14, but the real fun doesn’t begin until two weeks later.

After a four-game homestand at Pauley Pavilion against Montana State, Coastal Carolina, Nicholls State and Long Beach State — none of which ranked top 150 in RPI last season — the Bruins head to the Bahamas for a star-studded nonconference tournament.

The Battle 4 Atlantis on Thanksgiving week is the type of heavyweight competition that second-year head coach Steve Alford has openly pined for since arriving in Los Angeles. Matchups haven’t been finalized for the three-game slate, but UCLA is in a field that includes Florida, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Georgetown, Butler, Oklahoma and Alabama-Birmingham (UAB).

The Gators and the Badgers both made the Final Four this past season, while the Tar Heels and the Hoyas are among the sports bluebloods — even if neither team has been as formidable in recent years.

But UCLA will only host one major nonconference opponent: Gonzaga, whom the Bruins last faced in 2006′s all-time Sweet Sixteen thriller. The Bulldogs visit Pauley Pavilion on Dec. 13 to start a home-and-home series.

That’s followed by a huge Dec. 20 game against national runner-up Kentucky at the United Center as part of the CBS Sports Classic.

The Bruins will open Pac-12 play with five of their first seven games on the road, starting with a trip to Utah and Colorado on the Jan. 2-4 weekend. They will travel to Arizona and Arizona State on Feb. 18-22, but will not host either due to the conference’s schedule rotation.

Nonconference single-game tickets will go on sale Wednesday at uclabruins.com/tickets, while Pac-12 single-game tickets go on sale Oct. 1.

UCLA’s full schedule below: Continue reading

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Zach LaVine’s dunks light up Seattle Pro-Am

A reminder that Zach LaVine is still very, very good at dunking.

One pre-draft comparison lobbed about for UCLA’s one-and-done guard was Gerald Green, who a former dunk contest champ who finally turned himself into a serviceable NBA player this past season.

LaVine might not become a superstar, but he’s going to earn a ticket to All-Star weekend on hops alone.

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Pac-12 links: Former Cal athletic director Sandy Barbour heads to Penn State

» Just a month after stepping down (or being forced out) as Cal’s athletic director, Sandy Barbour parlayed an uneven tenure in the Bay Area into a bigger job at Penn State — one that will pay her $700,000 per year.

» Stanford’s Josh Huestis went to the Oklahoma City Thunder as the 29th overall pick in the NBA draft, but will head to the D-League rather than sign his guaranteed rookie contract. Grantland’s Zach Lowe explains why.

» Gary Payton II has arrived on the Oregon State campus, where his famous father’s enormous shadow still looms. Continue reading

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Pac-12 links: Brady Aiken, Jacob Nix remain unsigned as MLB deadline nears

» No. 1 overall pick Brady Aiken and fifth-rounder Jacob Nix, both of whom signed with UCLA, have yet to come to terms with the Houston Astros. The deadline to sign draft picks is Friday at 2 p.m. PT.

» Most fans aren’t happy with Utah’s newest mountain-sleeved Under Armour jerseys.

» Hall of Famer and former USC star Ronnie Lott calls Oregon “the greatest,” but admitted that UCLA is “the team that everybody’s talking about right now.”

» Oregon State’s new basketball assistants will earn a combined $535,008 annually. Continue reading

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Colorado State transfer Jon Octeus commits to UCLA

UCLA has added one more option to fill out the largest hole on its roster.

Colorado State point guard Jon Octeus will play his last year of college ball in Los Angeles, according to Scout.com’s Evan Daniels. The graduate transfer will help repair a thin backcourt that loses All-American point guard Kyle Anderson — a constant triple-double threat who was drafted 30th overall last night.

Octeus was third on the Rams in scoring (13.4), rebounding (4.7) and assists (2.3), starting all 32 games. He picked the Bruins over Missouri and Cincinnati.

He is now the only UCLA point guard with significant starting experience. The other candidates at the position are Bryce Alford, who backed up Anderson last season, and former five-star recruit Isaac Hamilton, who sat out the season for breaking his letter of intent to UTEP.

The Bruins struck pay dirt they last time they relied on a one-year transfer point guard. In 2012-13, Larry Drew II shed his maligned reputation at UNC by dishing out 256 assists — a new UCLA single-season record.

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Alford says Anderson, Adams can compensate for lack of athleticism

Of the UCLA trio selected in first round of Thursday’s NBA draft, one was chosen based almost solely on athletic ability. The other two, not so much.

Kyle Anderson and Jordan Adams may have to combine their test results to equal Zach LaVine’s 46-inch vertical, but UCLA coach Steve Alford isn’t worried about the criticism of his two sophomores’ athleticism. The 22nd and 30th picks of the draft may be diving into the deep end of the talent pool next season, but Alford is confident they’re in particularly good shape for the NBA above the shoulders.

“I think athleticism is way overrated for the most part,” Alford said. “You can either play or you can’t play and Jordan really understands how to play. You could give me the most athletic guy that we’ve played against collegiately this year and Jordan probably outplayed him because of being smarter and being tougher.”

To the credit of Adams, chosen 22nd by the Memphis Grizzlies, the 6-foot-5 guard was more than just a scorer at UCLA. He set a school record with 95 steals last season, an impressive statistic for someone projected as a potential defensive liability in the NBA.

Alford echoed some of his sentiments about Adams when referencing Anderson, who was selected 30th by the San Antonio Spurs. The third college basketball player in the last 30 years to average at least 14 points, eight rebounds and six assists in a season, the 6-foot-9 Anderson made a compelling case for Alford’s argument that he is a truly unique player with more than athleticism to lean on at the next level.

“As good a basketball IQ as I’ve coached,” Alford said of Anderson. “Sometimes a lot of people get wrapped up in athleticism and being able to jump over the backboard but do you know how to play the game?”

“I told him (Friday) morning, you don’t change who you are but you’ve got to take advantage of going to a franchise, an organization that really gets it from the bottom all the way to the top. So listen. Listen to people. You’ve always been coachable. Make sure you stay that way.”

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Alford: LaVine took advantage of UCLA brand, system to raise draft stock

In Steve Alford’s estimation, it wasn’t just Zach LaVine’s freakish athleticism that vaulted the freshman into the elite lottery portion of Thursday night’s NBA draft.

Wearing the UCLA letters across his chest for his lone collegiate season had plenty to do with LaVine becoming the 13th overall selection by the Minnesota Timberwolves, not to mention the fast-paced offensive approach employed by UCLA’s first-year coach.

“(LaVine) came in and he used the brand and this system,” Alford said. “I’ve always said it’s a very, very powerful brand and I think our style of play getting up and down the floor allows somebody like that to flourish and he had a tremendous freshman year.”

Though LaVine played just 37 college basketball games before achieving such lofty status, Alford didn’t know he had a lottery pick on his hands when the freshman reported to Westwood last summer.

“I don’t think you ever think that,” Alford said. “The NBA is a whole different level and mind set. We saw him this summer and he had incredible athleticism.

“To say we saw him being a lottery pick last summer, no.”

Facebook Twitter Plusone Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email