You might as well laugh: Day 3 of the Winter Meetings, for anyone who missed it.

True story: My wife and I share a birthday. Same exact date, three hours apart to the minute.

Wednesday was our birthday. We didn’t get to spend the day together last year. This year, a simple dinner would do. So I told my editor months ago that I was booking a three-night stay at the Winter Meetings hotel, then taking off Wednesday night. Play it by ear Thursday.

I pulled out of San Diego with the Jimmy Rollins trade still simmering, not looking like it would be resolved Wednesday, and Dee Gordon and Dan Haren firmly about to become Marlins. Checked with sources, felt good about the story, filed it at a Starbucks in Temecula, barely caught wind of the Brandon McCarthy signing before I turned off my iPhone. Because no good husband would constantly check his iPhone looking at sports news or doing work stuff during the birthday dinner.

Heh.

In case you missed it, this is how possibly the greatest one-day roster makeover in the history of the Dodgers franchise unfolded:
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Daily Distractions: You’re the best. No, really.

Yasiel Puig fans

Dodgers fans have pushed the team to first in Major League Baseball in attendance. (John McCoy/Staff Photographer)


If you’re a Dodger fan with a sense of entitlement, don’t let anyone knock you off your high horse today.

A recent study shows that Dodgers fans are the best. (OK, it’s actually a two-way tie for first.)

The study, conducted by a pair of marketing researchers at Emory University, contends that the Dodgers are getting as much out of their vast market than any team in baseball. Forbes’ team-by-team valuations are among the criteria, so the recent $2 billion sale of the franchise to Guggenheim Baseball Management certainly played a factor in the Dodgers placing first. Here’s a more detailed description of the research method:

… we use a “Revenue Premium” method. The intuition of this approach is that brand equity adds a premium to team’s revenues that goes beyond what would be expected based only on team quality and market size. To accomplish our analysis, we use a statistical model that predicts team revenues as a function of the team’s winning rates, division finish, market population, payroll, and stadium capacity. We use this model to predict each team’s expected revenue. To measure the quality of the team’s fan or brand equity we compare the forecasted revenue with estimates of actual revenue.

Earlier today, I discussed the two Southern California fan bases — Angels fans ranked 30th, dead last in the study — with local NPR affiliate KPCC (89.3-FM).

The only fanbase that matched the Dodgers? The Boston Red Sox, who coincidentally invade Dodger Stadium this weekend.

Some bullet points for a World Mosquito Day:
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