Love for the sweet science keeps ‘Sugar’ Shane Mosley in the ring

APTOPIX Mosley Pacquiao Boxing

“Sugar” Shane Mosley takes a punch from Manny Pacquiao during their May 2011 welterweight title fight in Las Vegas won by Pacquiao/AP file photo by Mark J. Terrill

 

“Sugar” Shane Mosley was laughing, getting a big kick out of how antsy his trainer – all-time great fighter Roberto Duran – is for Saturday. That’s when Mosley will take on David Avanesyan of Russia in the welterweight main event from Gila River Arena in Glendale, Ariz. (on CBS Sports Network).

“Yeah, it’s almost like we’re both fighting,” Mosley said. “He’s getting so excited and, not that he’s nervous, but he’s like, ‘Oh, my God,’ you know, like he’s getting ready to fight.”
Mosley said he tells Duran, “You gotta calm down a little bit, Roberto.”

Guys like this don’t calm down. That’s why Duran is one of the best ever. That’s why Mosley, who has won titles in three weight classes, is one of the best of his era and will join Duran in the International Boxing Hall of Fame five years or so after he finally hangs up the gloves.

It seemed Mosley was done when he had to quit after seven rounds against Anthony Mundine in November 2013, no thanks to severe back spasms. But he came back after 21 months off, won two fights against so-so opponents – a washed-up Ricardo Mayorga and journeyman Patrick Lopez – and now he’ll be challenging Avanesyan for his interim world title. Did we mention that Mosley, of Pomoma, is 44?

Yup. Mosley knew he’d fight a long time. Maybe not to 44, but …

“I kind of did,” he said Thursday via telephone. “I wanted to be a great fighter and I loved boxing so much, so I wanted to fight for as long as I could.”

Ego is involved. Mosley admits that.

“For respect,” he said, when asked why he’s still fighting. “I get a lot of respect and I am legendary and all that stuff. It’s because I love the game, I love to fight and I could still do it. I can still beat these guys. And I want to prove that, you know what I mean?”

Avanesyan is just 27, and Mosley believes a win over him would demonstrate he can still beat a young world-class fighter. Interestingly, if Mosley wins Saturday and takes the interim title from Avanesyan, Mosley (49-9-1, 41 KOs) would then be in line to fight the winner of the title fight between champion Keith Thurman and Shawn Porter on June 25 in Brooklyn.

If Porter were to emerge victorious, Mosley said he would not want to fight Porter because Porter “is like a little brother to me.” He would, however, take on Thurman should Thurman retain his belt.

“Yeah, of course I’ll take the fight with Thurman,” Mosley said, in confident tones.
That sounds scary because Thurman (26-0, 22 KOs) is very good and hits hard. And he’s just 27.

Mosley would be better off taking on guys his own age, or at least close. He would prefer that. Rematches with Miguel Cotto, Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr. would be fine. A fight with Juan Manuel Marquez would be cool, too.

“I would take Juan Manuel Marquez, Floyd Mayweather and Manny (Pacquiao),” Mosley said; those three are 42, 39 and 37, respectively; Cotto is the baby at 35. “At the time, I think Manny and Floyd are kind of retired, so I would go over to cotto and Marquez if they would like to fight. And, you know, just a few more and then I’ll probably be done.”

Well, maybe. Duran fought until he was 50.

“We both have that same desire,” Mosley said, “that desire to get in there and win.”

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

Floyd Mayweather Jr.: ‘I did not commit any violations’ by taking IV

Floyd Mayweather Jr./Photo by Gene Blevins, Hogan Photos

 

A story published Thursday by the Associated Press has Floyd Mayweather Jr. claiming he did nothing wrong by taking an IV solution to re-hydrate following the weigh-in for this past May’s welterweight title fight with Manny Pacquiao, won by Mayweather via unanimous decision at MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

Mayweather reportedly did not receive a formal exemption from the United States Anti-Doping Agency for the IV until weeks after the fight, but USADA admits it knew of the IV before Mayweather took it and that it contained no illegal substances.

“As already confirmed by the USADA statement, I did not commit any violations of the Nevada or USADA drug testing guidelines,” Mayweather said in a statement. “I follow and have always followed the rules of Nevada and USADA, the gold standard of drug testing.
“Let’s not forget that I was the one six years ago who insisted on elevating the level of drug testing for all my fights.  As a result, there is more drug testing and awareness of its importance in the sport of boxing today than ever before. I am very proud to be a clean athlete and will continue to champion the cause.”
The response by Mayweather and USADA came as a result of this story by Thomas Hauser on SB Nation.
Mayweather will take on Andre Berto at MGM Grand on Saturday night in what Mayweather says will be his final fight.
Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

Floyd Mayweather Jr. to defend titles Sept. 12 against Andre Berto

Floyd Mayweather Jr./Photo by Gene Blevins, Hogan Photos

 

Floyd Mayweather Jr. on Tuesday finally announced his next opponent. It will be former world champion Andre Berto.

The two will square off for Mayweather’s two welterweight belts Sept. 12 at MGM Grand in Las Vegas (on Showtime pay-per-view).

Mayweather, 38, waited a long time before deciding who might be the last opponent of his career. A news release claims it will be just that, but most in the industry believe Mayweather (48-0, 26 KOs) will fight one more time after this for a chance to finish 50-0.

“I’m ready to get back in the ring on Sept. 12 and prove again to the whole world why I’m the best ever,” Mayweather said. “I always bring my ‘A’ game and this fight against Andre Berto is no exception.”

Berto (30-3, 23 KOs) believes he’ll be the first to hand Mayweather a defeat. But that’s not likely.

“I’m coming to kick Floyd’s ass on Sept. 12,” he said. “Best believe that I plan to bring it to Floyd and I’m not concerned about what 48 other fighters have been unable to do. Somebody is getting knocked out and it won’t be me.”

 

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

Leo Santa Cruz wins decision over Jose Cayetano in Saturday’s semi-main

The semi-main event Saturday underneath Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Manny Pacquiao featured super bantamweight champion Leo Santa Cruz of Lincoln Heights taking on Jose Cayetano of Tijuana in a non-title fight in the featherweight division.

Even though Santa Cruz was moving up in weight, he figured to have an easy time of it as Cayetano (17-4) is not in his class. Santa Cruz (30-0-1) did in the sense that he won big on the scorecards – he won by three scores of 100-90. But fans seemed a bit restless that he could not stop Cayetano inside the distance.

There were a few boos.

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

Video: De La Hoya not a fan of Mayweather, rooting Pacquiao

Oscar De La Hoya, speaking from inside the Golden Boy Promotions office in Downtown L.A. on Tuesday, described Manny Pacquiao as the hero and Floyd Mayweather Jr. as the villain in what’s being billed as “The Fight of The Century.”

“Mayweather has this image,” he said. “The money and the flash and this-and-that. As person I don’t know him to well to judge him, but from what I’ve read, what I’ve heard, I just don’t like what he represents.”

De La Hoya, who has brought boxing back to Downtown L.A. with Golden Boy Promotions’ L.A. Fight Club, added that boxing fans want to see Pacquiao win Saturday’s fight.

“The majority of the fans out there want to see Manny Pacquiao give Floyd Mayweather his first loss,” including De La Hoya himself. “I’m a huge Pacquiao fan and I’m rooting for Pacquiao.”

See more of what De La Hoya had to say in the video below, also check out more of his interview in this column by the L.A. Daily News’ Mark Whicker.

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

PHOTOS: Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao media workouts

SAXoPicture-0938ACBC-713029796

Photos by Gene Blevins/LA Daily News

Floyd Mayweather Jr., in Las Vegas, and Manny Pacquiao, in Hollywood, worked out in front of the media Wednesday ahead of their mega clash on May 2.

Mayweather’s workout included a guest appearance from David Hasselhoff.

Pacquiao’s workout also drew a big crowd in Hollywood, where Bob Arum had some interesting things to say.

Below is a sample of our photos from the workout, but click the links to get the check out all of the photos (all 140 of them).
SAXoPicture-0938ACCC-398504253

SAXoPicture-0938ADBC-23453774

SAXoPicture-0938ACEC-246060542

SAXoPicture-0938AD1C-969627362

May Crowd

SAXoPicture-0938AD5C-311020774

May

 

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

Manny Pacquiao hopeful Floyd Mayweather Jr. tries to knock him out

Manny Pacquiao/Photo courtesy of Top Rank Inc.

 

Manny Pacquiao on Wednesday played host to a media workout at the Wild Card gym in Hollywood, where he is trained by Freddie Roach. A couple of hundred reporters and photographers were on hand, and that’s not including the 50 or so who were turned away because there wasn’t enough room for them.

During a question-and-answer period, Pacquiao was asked if it would be to his advantage if Floyd Mayweather Jr. opens up and tries to knock him out when they tangle May 2 in a welterweight title-unification fight at MGM Grand in Las Vegas (on HBO and Showtime pay-per-view). Pacquiao responded with a slight smile on his face.

“Well, if he does that, that’s good for me,” Pacquiao said. “I mean, I like that. That’s what I want and that’s definitely what the fans want, you know, action.”

 

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

Floyd Mayweather Jr. suggests he has emotional edge over Manny Pacquiao

Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, will square off with Manny Pacquiao on May 2 at MGM Grand in Las Vegas/Photos by Associated Press

 

Floyd Mayweather Jr. at Wednesday’s news conference touched on the psychological element of his May 2 fight against Manny Pacquiao at MGM Grand in Las Vegas (on HBO pay-per-view, Showtime pay-per-view). He intimated he has the edge in this department.

“One thing I do know about any sport, when you lose, it’s in your mind,” Mayweather said at Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. “If you lost once, it’s in your mind. If you lost twice, it’s in your mind. From day one, I was always taught to be a winner. No matter what, be a winner, push yourself to the limit, stay focused and be the best that you can be.”

It was Mayweather’s way of reminding the more than 600 reporters in attendance that while Pacquiao (57-5-2, 38 KOs) has lost more than once, he is undefeated at 47-0 with 26 knockouts.

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail

Floyd Mayweather Sr. says now people ‘fixing’ to find out who’s really scared

 

 

 

The shadows of Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao facing off at Wednesday’s news conference/Photo by Gene Blevins, Los Angeles Daily News

Floyd Mayweather Sr had heard enough talk about his son being afraid to fight Manny Pacquiao, that he just had to tell us about it outside Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles ahead of the Wednesday news conference there promoting the May 2 Pacquiao-Floyd Mayweather Jr. fight at MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

“All the stuff they’ve been saying about the fight, I know one thing, that Floyd ain’t the one that’s scared,” Floyd Sr. said. “Everybody was talking about Floyd was scared. Now you’re fixing to find out who’s scared.”

The elder Mayweather, who trains Floyd Jr., then came with quite a zinger.

“This fight here is a professional fighting a sub-novice fighter,” he said.

Uh, OK.

Mayweather, 38, is 47-0 with 26 knockouts. Pacquiao, 36, is 57-5-2 with 38 knockouts. This will be a title-unification bout and both HBO and Showtime will have it available on their respective pay-per-view arms.

 

 

 

Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit Tumblr Email Snailmail