Column: New history of 1960s LA unrest includes SB riot

“Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties,” a new history, includes a 1968 riot in San Bernardino that started at a high school and spilled into the streets. I recount that and also pluck some local history from “Ecology of Fear,” a previous book by the same author, Mike Davis, while also saying farewell to a San Bernardino restaurateur. All this in Friday’s column.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Linkedin Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Column: Mitla Cafe fares well in tortilla tourney

San Bernardino’s legendary Mitla Cafe got to Round 4 of the Tortilla Tournament in the corn tortilla bracket before falling to the reigning champion in Costa Mesa, a nice showing for both Mitla and the 909. Anyway, this modest news hook provides a good excuse to write about Mitla, which I do in Sunday’s column.

Mitla (pronounced “Meet-la”) was the subject of a Restaurant of the Week post in 2015 and was overdue for a column now that I’m in the Sun and thus have a San Bernardino-area readership. (And in the Press-Enterprise with a Riverside-area readership, hence last Sunday’s column on Anchos Southwest Grill.)

So it was high time I went there and introduced myself. Because they’re not doing dine-in, I didn’t order food to go, unsure where I would eat it. As I drove away, I saw a shady park less than a block away. D’oh! Well, next time.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Linkedin Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Column: Who saw Janis Joplin sing in San Bernardino?

I pose the above question to readers concerning her concerts at Swing Auditorium in 1968 and 1970. Also: readers respond pro, con and somewhere in the middle concerning drive-thrus, and a Riverside woman appears on “Jeopardy!” All this in Sunday’s column.

This column, by the way, is more thrown-together than usual. It happens sometimes. I had forgotten that I’d received so many comments on drive-thrus via Twitter and Facebook until looking back at them Thursday afternoon and deciding I might as well make use of them.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Linkedin Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Column: 5 years a slave in San Bernardino, respected in DTLA

Do you know the name and story of Biddy Mason? Not enough people do. She was brought to San Bernardino a slave in 1851, won her freedom in court in 1856 and became a nurse and midwife in downtown Los Angeles, a landowner and a philanthropist. I tell her remarkable story in Sunday’s column. It also answers the question of which historical figure with a connection to San Bernardino led me to take Metrolink last weekend, as hinted in last Wednesday’s column. Some guessed right; others guessed Wyatt Earp or Edith Head.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Linkedin Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

KMEN-dous

Responding to Sunday’s column on the KFXM tiger, reader Don J. sent me a blog post about rival KMEN, the San Bernardino station that helped bring the Rolling Stones to the United States (the subject of several columns of mine in the past year, for any latecomers).

Jason Rosenthal’s “The Southern Californian” devoted a 2015 post to KMEN’s four (in his view) claims to distinction, involving the Beach Boys, DJ John Peel, Jimmy Webb’s song “Up, Up and Away” (!) and, yes, the Stones.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Linkedin Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email

Column: Stones’ 3rd Swing show was off the hook

Third in a sort-of series, I write about the Rolling Stones’ third (of four) concerts at San Bernardino’s Swing Auditorium in Friday’s column, 55 years to the day of the show itself. I’m a little amazed how much information I was able to find from various sources about one 1960s concert, although I thought that the first two times too. We’ll resume this series in July 2021, the 55th anniversary of the fourth concert.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Linkedin Digg Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Email